Coneflower

Echinacea spp. also known as Coneflowers, are a popular and colorful perennial accent for landscapes, gardens, and as cut flowers ranging in height from 24 inches to 4 to 6 feet. Hardy from zone 2 to 10 depending on the variety, they require full sun to partial shade, average watering, and come in a variety of colors. Echinacea spp. bloom in mid-summer to mid-fall and attract bees, butterflies, and birds as well as being unattractive to deer. The most common coneflower for Texas landscapes is the Eastern Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) which is characterized by a medium purple flower with petals that hang down from the seed head.

In the landscape, you may Coneflowers or similar plants in naturalistic designs such as Texas native or English garden style, and in containers. Coneflowers are some of my personal favorite for their simple blooms and natural look in the landscape. They pair well with Artemisia, Rosemary, boulders, Salvia, and grasses.

 

Other Varieties:

Pixie Meadowbrite Coneflower (Echinacea ‘CBG Cone 2’) has a vibrant pink flower with an orange center with petals that hold themselves horizontally. It can be 8-20 inches tall and 2 feet wide with more than 20 flowers on a single plant, and is hardy throughout Texas in zones 4-9.

Echinacea ‘Julia’ is a compact cultivar of Echinacea with bright orange flowers that grow 15-18 inches tall. It is hardy in Texas (zones 6-9) and needs full sun. It is a lovely alternative to the common purples and pinks normally seen in coneflowers.

Echinacea purpurea ‘Double Scoop Cranberry’ is another interesting coneflower that differs in appearance from the standard. It has a pompom like flower with slender petals falling downwards from a double blooming center. It is bright and vibrant in the garden and makes for an excellent cut flower for arrangements and bouquets. It is hardy in all of Texas (zones 4 to 9).

Echinacea hybrida ‘Cheyenne Spirit’ is a variety of coneflower featuring a mixture of colors from yellow to red to purple in a massed planting. It provides a colorful and natural look to any landscape and looks great as a potted plant. It is hardy from zone 4 to 10 and can be grown in most of the continental US.

More Varieties: ‘Magnus’, ‘Razzmatazz’, ‘Merlot’,  ‘Cleopatra’, ‘Passion Fruit’, ‘Butterfly Kisses’,  ‘Evening Glow’ , and ‘Supreme Cantaloupe’

Similar to Echinacea: Coreopsis, Ratibida columnifera or Mexican Hat, Rudbeckia or Black Eyed Susan, wildflower Indian Blanket

 

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