• Planting for Dogs

    Posted on January 9, 2015 by Kristin in The New Homeowner.

    Many homeowners with dogs struggle with the same problems and ask the same questions. How do I get my dog to stop peeing on my garden? Are there dog pee resistant plants? Are there DOG resistant plants? The truth is, training is the best way to handle plant related dog problems, but there are some other things you can do to protect your plants until the training can be improved.

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    1.  How do I get my dog to stop peeing on my garden?

    Providing a dog with their own mulch area or artificial “doggie” turf area is a good solution. Dogs tend to use the same areas, and after a few opportunities to practice they will understand which area has been created just for them. These alternative solutions can be designed to fit with the overall backyard design, and HDG Landscape Design can help with an overall master plan that includes this. Dogs tend to use the same areas, and they will continue to use the areas you ask them to use after a few opportunities to practice.

    1. Are there dog pee resistant plants?

    You must research the salt tolerant plants suited for your area to begin to answer this question. Urine, after all, is comprised of many things including salt. As your dog continues to use the same area, the plant’s root zone will become damaged, and seedling germination will be harmed.  For damage in sod areas, try the solutions to question 1 above. If you plan to replace garden plants in damaged areas, then this is a good opportunity to incorporate more salt tolerant plants like Buddleia officinalis, Callistemon spp., and Tulbaghia violacea to name a just a few examples.

    1. Are there DOG resistant plants?

    20141126_172750NO! However, HDG has extensive experience designing dog friendly backyards with plants that can handle the bad habits of large or small dogs. For dogs that chew on plants, select a hard wood shrub that is not poisonous to dogs such as Texas Sage. For dogs that trample anything in their path, select a hard wood shrub with a compact form such as Indian Hawthorn.  For dogs that dig, try a more drastic route by adding boulders or large river rock (approx.. 4” -6” per piece) in locations that will protect the root zone of tender plants. In some cases, giving dogs their own “digging box” is a solution to dogs that dig for the purpose of finding a cool spot to rest.

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